"Something All Our Own", The Grant Hill Collection of African American Art.

Tamia is a chart-topping R&B artist with four Grammy nominations.

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Feature News

The HillTop

“PERSONAL WITH BILL RHODEN” DEBUTS ON EPIX JUNE 11TH

June 11th, 2014

Grant and Calvin Hill Talk About Team Ownership, The Clashing World of Cultural Issues and The Challenges of Professional Athletes Today

Features most recent and timely sit-down with the NFL Legend and his Superstar NBA son

New York, NY (June 2, 2014) – EPIX, the premium entertainment network, announced today that the premiere of a new 30-minute special series, “Personal with Bill Rhoden,” will air on Wednesday, June 11 at 8pm ET with a pair of America’s most elite athletes and personalities, NFL Hall-of-Famer Calvin Hill and his son, recently retired NBA superstar Grant Hill. Recorded last month in Atlanta, the show will touch on many of the current topics in American sports, from the Donald Sterling situation to race relations and the changing views and acceptance of the LGBT community to the on-going issues professional athletes and men of color face in society today. In the discussion, Grant talks frankly about his dealing with Sterling and the challenges of being a professional athlete today, while Calvin gives his unique perspective on the same issues from the vantage point of both a parent and a legendary star in the NFL. Bill Rhoden, an award-winning sports journalist with The New York Times, conducts the up close and intimate interview.

“We are very excited to have these two iconic personalities as our first guests on ‘Personal with Bill Rhoden,’” said Mark Greenberg EPIX CEO. “Our goal with all our documentaries is to discuss the issues of today, and we could not have a more timely presentation. It will be a memorable half-hour presented only as a journalist like Bill Rhoden can do.”

Grant Hill was a seven time All-Star during an 18 year NBA career with the Detroit Pistons, Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns and Los Angeles Clippers following an All-America career at Duke University, where he helped lead the Blue Devils to a pair of NCAA Titles. Calvin Hill was a four-time Pro Bowl selection during a 13-year career with the Dallas Cowboys, Washington Redskins and Cleveland Browns after a standout career as a collegian at Yale University. They also have the unique tie of being a father/son combination to have both been named Rookie of the Year in their respective sports, Calvin in 1969-70 and Grant in 1994 – 95. More importantly than their work on the field was the respect both have gained in the business world and in their personal lives as role models and mentors to people of all ages, creeds and color.

Personal with Bill Rhoden” is a give and take between two generations of elite athletes, as each plays off Rhoden’s questions on the world we live in today and where athletes and race factor into bigger discussions in society. Calvin Hill touches on the issues he faced in the segregated south and how he has had to adjust some of his views as the world has evolved with a new-found social acceptance of people from diverse backgrounds, while Grant Hill expounds upon the use of social media as a tool for athletes to have a voice today, his reaction to the goings-on around the LA Clippers (which he is purportedly involved with one of the bidding groups), and the new-found consciousness of the American athlete in the world today, among other topics.

Downloadable Clips
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For more information visit http://press.epix.com

Personal with Bill Rhoden” is an EPIX Original Presentation produced by Starship SA, LLC. Seth G. Abraham and Tim Braine are the co-executive producers, Paul James is the director and Ross Bernard is the Executive-in-charge of production for EPIX. Abraham, who formerly headed up HBO Sports, Time Warner Sports and was the President of Madison Square Garden, founded Starship SA LLC in 2004. Braine is a multi-award winning producer of televised sports, documentaries and comedy for HBO. James has directed hundreds of national commercials and promos as well as written & directed original content for brands and corporations including HP, Sony®, HBO, Arm & Hammer®, Glad, Showtime, ESPN and CBS.

“I have wanted to create an interview program like this for 30 years and we could not have found a better way to start the series than with Grant and Calvin,” said Abraham. “Bill Rhoden’s style brought out the best in them, and we think he has set a new standard for the interview with his work on this inaugural show.”

Join the conversation about #GetPersonal on Twitter, on Facebook and on the webpage.

View original press release.

Grant Hill reflects on leaving basketball behind, looking toward future

November 27th, 2013

By Grant Hill, Special to SI.com

Grant Hill spent five years with the Phoenix Suns before heading to the Clippers for his final season in the NBA.

SI.com is taking a look at the lives of some of sports’ most notable former players across the NBA, NFL and MLB. From weighing in on life in retirement to providing their analysis on today’s crop of stars, these athletes share their thoughts.

In October 2012, I began my 19th NBA season. I felt then it could be my last. The emotional and physical investment required to play at an elite level, especially when you have played for many years, is hard to describe. However, I was comfortable in the routine of what I had done for an entire career. The rhythms of the season are comforting and I still anticipated them with excitement. The idea of changing those rhythms and not playing one day, was not attractive. After six wonderful years in Detroit, followed by seven years, five surgeries and rehab and reward in Orlando, I found a comfort zone in Phoenix. I left Phoenix for a crack at a championship with the Clippers. But going into that year, I felt it could be my last. My attitude and mindset were positive, but the year started with a nagging injury in training camp. I then missed a few months at the start of the season. The thought that this was a sign it was time to end this chapter of my life started to creep into my mind but I quickly repressed it. I was motivated to get back, to contribute to what was a well-constructed team, and to make a contribution to the success of the L.A. Clippers.

The season did not end in a championship but at its conclusion, I knew it was time. I had peace of mind. I had taken in the highs and lows of that season and I had appreciated every minute. The constant fire in the belly was extinguished. The hunger, the mental and physical fortitude necessary to maintain the edge to compete was gone. I was able to announce my retirement on TNT, surrounded by my contemporaries and friends who themselves had once faced that day. I was done. And, I was excited. I was looking forward to my next phase.

I knew I could look in the mirror and be proud that I did the best I could as a professional athlete.

Like most pro athletes, I have more than one dimension that defines me. For a long time I cast aside many things I wanted to do to concentrate on my career. Now, the difficulty I am having is trying to pace myself so that I’m not doing everything at once. For 13 years, I have had a successful real estate investment business. Two years ago, along with my partners, we started Penta Mezzanine Fund, a private investment firm in Orlando providing $2-$15 million customized growth capital solutions to profitable, lower-middle-market companies nationwide. Every day I am in town, I am in our office reviewing deals with my partners and our very talented analysts. Co-hosting Inside Stuff on NBATV and working occasionally as a studio analyst on NBATV and TNT is a thrill. I am able to stay in and around the game while sharing my perspective and insights on the players, the game itself and other issues surrounding our sport. For the second time in my professional life, I am a rookie surrounded by broadcasting veterans who are also friends and contemporaries. Steve Smith, Shaq, CWebb, Dennis Scott, Brent Barry were teammates or opponents during my playing days. Charles, Kenny, Steve Kerr, Reggie Miller and many others were models for my own career as an athlete … and now as a broadcaster. Ahmad Rashad is the perfect example of an athlete who made a successful and impactful transition from pro football to another career. A contemporary and friend of my dad in the NFL, he set the standard for sports hosting in his role at Inside Stuff. It is an intimidating privilege and honor to follow in his footsteps.

Ahmad is one of many former professional athletes whom I have met and who have transitioned into a role outside their sport. Roger Staubach, Heisman winner at Navy and star QB of the Dallas Cowboys, started, built and sustained his real estate consulting business for more than 25 years. Junior Bridgeman, standout veteran of the NBA, is one of the largest franchise owners in the Wendy’s system. Jamal Mashburn and I competed head-to-head in college and in the NBA. Today he is an owner of numerous car dealerships as well as quick service restaurants. Dave Bing, one of the 50 greatest NBA players, former Piston, founder of Bing Steel and present Mayor of Detroit, sets a standard that every player should aspire to match. There are many others, many of whom I want to meet to seek their advice for my future.

I advise today’s athletes to start preparing for their retirement while they are playing. There’s a lot of life and living after retirement. I haven’t figured it all out yet. Today’s players should take advantage of the platform of their sport, of the doors opened by your pro career. When the end comes, it comes abruptly. Tap into the relationships you have developed through your career. Tap into your alumni association of your college. You are an alumnus, regardless of your length of time in college. If you want to coach, talk to coaches in the league about your interests and seek their advice.

In addition to my duties in broadcasting, private equity and real estate, I serve on the Board of the Orlando Museum of Art; I am co-chair of the Duke Class of 1994′s 20th reunion; I serve on President Obama’s Council on Physical Fitness, Sports and Nutrition; I am considering another tour of our personal collection of African American art; and I give speeches to business audiences about the lessons of sports that translate to the business world.

Without the routines and rhythms of the NBA, I find there is no “typical” day in my life. Most weekdays, I carpool my kids to and from school, try to enforce the no eating rule in the back seat, return to school for my daughter’s basketball practice three times a week, referee arguments, help with homework and participate more fully in my family’s day-to-day life. By far, that is the most rewarding and most difficult job I have.

Grant Hill, ex-NBA standout, has new broadcast career with Turner Sports, NBA TV

November 18th, 2013

Edward M. Pio Roda/Edward M. Pio Roda – After announcing his retirement after last season, Grant Hill will host a rebooted version of “NBA Inside Stuff.”

By Michael Lee, Washington Post

Grant Hill was once ashamed of the 12-inch scar along his left arm, the remnants of a strip of flesh that had to be removed to graft together the skin around his surgically repaired left ankle. It signified so many “woulda, coulda, shouldas” for a career in which his prime years were decimated by injuries. He wanted it covered so that others wouldn’t ask questions about the staph infection that nearly cost him his life and his arduous fight to keep playing basketball.

Having retired from basketball nearly six months ago, the former standout from South Lakes High in Reston has had some time to reflect on his 19-year NBA career and incredible four-year run in college. Hill now believes that the scar, which came as a result of his darkest moment in the NBA, represents his greatest triumph.

“More so than the championships at Duke, the Olympics, the all-stars, the Fila shoes, or whatever else, I think it’s the overcoming and coming back that — I don’t know if it’s legacy or whatever — but I think to people that’s the narrative, that’s the story,” Hill said. “I’m proud of having gone through it. Now looking back at it through a different perspective, it was probably foolish. I probably should’ve hung it up 10 years ago. But I am a little stubborn.”

Hill’s determination and perseverance helped him come back from five ankle surgeries to make another all-star team in 2004-05, after he had missed most of the previous four seasons. He also remade himself at the back end of his career, becoming a defensive stopper and a surprisingly durable player until his body broke down again. Once last season ended, Hill didn’t need much time to think about what was next. He was done.

“I got to the point where I just knew that, okay, it was time to move on, time to do something different. And I had not felt that way at any other point prior,” Hill said. “I think every player, you have to have a fight in you. And I think certainly, when you’re battling or struggling back from injuries or adversities, that certainly is magnified. I got tired of fighting that fight.”

Hill continued: “Certainly, I exhausted my career in terms of playing, so there will be no regrets there. I’m looking for new fights, new challenges.”

Hill, 41, is penning the next chapter of his life, which includes being a partner in a private investment firm, doing some public speaking and staying close to basketball as a broadcaster with Turner Sports. He will be most visible as the co-host for the reboot of “NBA Inside Stuff,” which airs Saturdays on NBA TV. Hill grew up watching the show and he was featured several times on the program as one of the many “main men” of former host, Ahmad Rashad.

“I’m fired up and excited. One of the sort of neat ways you stay around the game and tell the stories of the best basketball players in the world. It’s quite an honor to do so,” Hill said of his latest endeavor. “Ahmad really put his stamp on the show and made the show hugely successful. Those are giant shoes to fill. I know a thing or two about coming after greatness, being called ‘The Next’ or whatever.”

The Inside Stuff with Grant Hill: Career Stories of the Ex-NBA Star and TV Host

November 6th, 2013

BY JARED ZWERLING (NBA ANALYST)

Grant Hill

After the 2012-13 regular season ended, former NBA star Grant Hill was in demand on and off the court. Not only did the Los Angeles Clippers want him back, but after he retired on June 1, several television networks reached out to one of the most respected, articulate and intelligent players in the league.

But Hill was really sold on one opportunity: a chance to lead NBA TV’s Inside Stuff in its return after being off the air for eight years. Hill said the show, previously co-hosted by Ahmad Rashad and Summer Sanders, stood out to him because it profiled players behind the scenes, in their daily lives beyond the court.

While the show will feature regular staples like “Rewind” and “Jam Session,” Hill and co-host Kristen Ledlow will also explore adding creative elements during the season.

“I remember them coming out to Detroit doing some stuff for the show, and it was a big thrill,” he told Bleacher Report the day before Inside Stuff debuted on Saturday. “It was a show that I remember watching in college and even watching when I was in the league just to see who they were featuring and what was going on. Now to follow in their footsteps is a big thrill.”

Keeping to the themes of Inside Stuff, Bleacher Report rewound the clock with Hill, going on a journey with him throughout his career to discover personal and revealing stories about the game and experiences he had over 19 years. The conversation started with his days at Duke, playing for Mike Krzyzewski.

Craziest or funniest Coach K story: “Oh, man. If I tell the craziest, funniest stories, I might not be invited back there on campus. The craziest story—it wasn’t necessarily the funniest—but my freshman year playing our first game in the ACC at UVA, we lost; we got blown out. We bus back for three-and-a-half hours, we got off the bus, and he wants everybody taped and ready on the court in 10 minutes.

“We practiced, and it was the worst practice I’ve ever been a part of. I actually broke my nose during the practice. But it was also very eye-opening in that he let me know about establishing a standard of excellence. There was a lot of running, a lot of profanity, a lot of getting in our faces, but I am proud to say that after that, we never had another practice like that with Coach K.”

Coach K and Grant Hill

John W. McDonough / Getty Images 1992

Hardest adjustment to the NBA: “I think the pace of the season, the amount of games. I also think just learning to get your rest. I know that sounds crazy, but you get into a mold and routine of playing late, flying late, getting in at 2, 3 in the morning—just learning how to prepare and get yourself ready. That was the biggest adjustment. The physicality was certainly something as well. Those were probably the two main things early on.”

Michael Jordan comparison early in his career: “I kind of laughed at all of that. Certainly, I wasn’t the first ‘Next.’”

His mentors as a rookie who are still good friends: “I had Joe Dumars. I had Johnny Dawkins. I had Mark West. Those were three guys early in my career that I played with in Detroit, and to this day, we are good friends. I was with Mark for about six years in Phoenix when he was in the front office. Johnny Dawkins is coaching at Stanford—he’s been like a big brother to me through the years. Those are the types of guys that really had a meaningful impact and a great influence on me early in my career, throughout and even to the end.”

Top on-court moments: “I think one of the ones I liked the best was dunking on Alonzo (Mourning, right after they got tangled up and into a shouting match). That was pretty cool back in ’98. I get to relive it every once in a while when I see it on TV. I know I had a game against the Bulls in ’97. I had a triple-double at home, and we beat them. That was pretty cool.

“Even the experience in Phoenix. When we beat the Spurs, we swept them in the playoffs (in 2010). They had been our nemesis for so long, and to beat them, that was pretty cool. Also, the Olympics (in 1996). I’ve had a lot of great experiences throughout my career.”

Top off-court moments: “That’s the best part—the off-the-court stuff, being in the locker room with the guys, on the road, going to eat.

“I know one time, it was pretty cool, I think it was maybe my second year in the league and we played the Bulls, and after the game, I went to eat with Michael (Jordan) at his restaurant. That was fun. It was pretty cool to hang out with him. I’ve met all these guys that I grew up watching and idolizing—Dr. J, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Magic. The fan in you, to have an opportunity to spend time with those greats was and has been a big thrill of mine, and also getting to know some of the current guys.

“You remember the games a bit and the highlights, but it’s the relationships, it’s the experiences, it’s being a part of this fraternity that we’re all a part of, which, to me, is the most memorable. Now, we get a chance to showcase the same thing (on Inside Stuff) that I’ve seen behind closed doors for 19 years, and certainly that’s what the buzz was about the show when they had it before.”

Grant Hill fouls Michael Jordan

Andrew Cutraro / Getty Images 1998

Best individual move: “I think my favorite move, I think what I was good at was I had a good first step and I could really get to the basket. I think from that I evolved, particularly in my last few years in Detroit, into a really good mid-range shooter, and then the post was something that I was good at.”

Development of his quick crossover to pull-up jump shot: “Early in my career, I was all about getting to the hole, getting to the free-throw line, and then I started to realize that people were giving me the 10- to 15-foot jumper. I felt like I could get to that; I could get to 10 feet and put people on their heels. I worked hard at it during the lockout in ’98, and really my last year in Detroit when I was healthy. I think (my game) was really coming together then.

“Before I got hurt (in 2000), I was in a really good groove and playing at a high level, and feeling really good about beating people in different ways—beating you in the post, getting to the basket, getting to the free-throw line, in transition. The next step would’ve been probably working in a three-point shot, but I looked at it as there are like five or six ways to dominate. It was fun, and it was certainly fulfilling knowing you put a lot of hard work in to get those results.”

Best basketball trick: “I didn’t have a whole lot of tricks. I used to be able to do—I can’t do it anymore—a soccer rainbow from the free-throw line and have it go off the backboard and go up and dunk it. I used to always say that if I ever got in the Slam Dunk Contest, I would’ve done it. It might take me three tries to get it up there.

“But there are certain tricks you pick up when you’re playing, and how to go about how to hold people, how to use your leverage, do things that the refs might not see. Those things you pick up from playing with guys like Dumars or playing against guys like Jordan, and then I’d incorporate that in my game to be effective.”

Most overlooked aspect of his game: “I think what was overlooked, and I think certainly got some credit in the end, was my defense. I think because I didn’t necessarily have the responsibilities that I had earlier in my career, I was able to devote more of my time to the defense. I thought at an older age, I was able to prove that I could still go out there and play defense at a high level. I think people were shocked, but I was the Defensive Player of the Year in college, and I did play at Duke. It was something that I always felt like I was pretty good at.

“Maybe my toughness as well. Those who know me know that I put my body on the line, took charges, I dove for the ball, I never backed down. I don’t think I was really thought of as a defender. I was older and later in my career when I was probably a half a step slower and playing with one ankle.”

Potential of him and Tracy McGrady together: “Tracy was great. I think when he signed there, I didn’t even know how good he was. It was unfortunate that I was hurt, it was unfortunate that we didn’t get a chance to play together because, I’m not saying we could’ve won it that year, but I think the two of us—me in my prime and him kind of going into his—who knows what we could’ve done? We could play the what-if game all day long. It was unfortunate, but I got a chance to watch his greatness on display, and he truly was a remarkable player, particularly in his years in Orlando.”Eric Drotter / Getty Images 1995

How close he was to signing with the New York Knicks in 2009: “I was. The time that I really wanted to come and maybe would’ve come if it had been different was back in 2000, when I was a free agent out of Detroit. I was always a huge fan of New York and remember meeting with Dave Checketts and (Jeff) Van Gundy. It wasn’t even the injuries that did it; they were talking about trading Pat Ewing for me, and I wanted to play with Pat. I grew up a huge Georgetown fan—that’s why I wore 33.

“One of the reasons that I didn’t come was I just felt like not being the one that was traded for Pat Ewing. I don’t know if it would’ve happened or not, but that was when it was probably the most serious. I had visited the team a number of times and flirted with the idea, but if I was going to do New York, I wanted to be young and in my prime and have a chance to really play at a high level—not when I was an old 37-year-old.”

Impact of the Phoenix Suns’ esteemed training stuff in his later years: “They were great, especially working with (Dr.) Mike Clark. It was really good for me at that point in my career, coming off that situation in Orlando where I just struggled with injuries. Being able to go to Phoenix and be myself and play and get a lot of enjoyment from that, a lot of that was because I was able to stay healthy. They are the best; they treat the body as a whole.

“It’s hard for me to explain, but it was great working with them. I was able to go from a guy who couldn’t stay healthy to a guy who was basically an iron man for a few years. It was pretty cool.”

Thought of being a trendsetter on or off the court: “I don’t know if I was a trendsetter, but I think what was really cool for me and kind of interesting was last year going to L.A. to a team with a lot of great players—and sort of feeling a level of respect that they had for me and the things I had done and the things that I was currently doing, primarily off the court.

“I had an art collection that I toured. I collected African-American art, and I had a collection that toured for two years about seven years ago. We had it at various museums across the country and overseas. It may not have gotten a lot of publicity, but certainly in the art world, it was something outside of the norm of professional athletes.

“I don’t know if everyone really knows about that, but hopefully it inspired people that it’s OK to do something outside the box. If you have an interest or hobby or something that’s not so stereotypical, it’s OK to share that.”

Best coaches he played for: “Coach K was obviously a great coach. Doug Collins, I learned a great deal from him early in my career. Mike D’Antoni I think offensively is a mastermind and genius. I learned a great deal from him. So I’ve had a lot of coaches—some good, some bad—but I was fortunate to learn from all of them.”

Toughest player to guard: “Now that I’m retired, I can probably say now that I don’t have to see him anymore is Kobe (Bryant). I felt like I played him well, and I felt like I made him work. But I’d go out there and he’d still hit some crazy shots on me. I would’ve liked to go against him when I was younger, and I had some moments when I was in Detroit. Even in recent years, he was tough.

“It was hard to really have a game plan for him because he really didn’t have a whole lot of weaknesses. He could go either way, he could go over each shoulder in the post, he could catch and shoot, he could go off the dribble. A lot of guys have a game plan to try to stick to, and certain guys have tendencies—they prefer going over this shoulder or prefer going right or left—but with Kobe, it was hard to figure him out. I tried to give him a bunch of different looks.”

Thought of a Hill-Bryant segment on Inside Stuff: “Oh yeah. I’d love to sit down with him on the court and maybe even watch some of the plays where I was guarding him and kind of pick his brain. I always felt he was the hardest to guard. Shoot, I want to know what he’s thinking in certain situations and where he’s trying to get to. He was a competitor. It’s hard to say that and acknowledge that. I didn’t mind guarding LeBron and Melo and KD, but Kobe used to give me a lot of problems.”

Playing at 50 years old like MJ: “I don’t know. I had some nagging injuries the last few years, and it just mentally kind of wore me down and I didn’t want to keep going. I was ready to do something different. I probably could’ve gotten another two or three years. I think I really learned to take care of myself. I was under contract for another year, and it was really fulfilling for me to walk away from the game healthy—and walk away still having something left. L.A. still wanted me to come back, but it was time. It was time to go. But 50? Nah, I don’t know if I could go to 50.”

Singing with his wife, R&B artist Tamia, and his musical interests: “I can’t sing, but I can play the keyboards a little bit. If you go on YouTube, we did a little thing she posted, where she’s singing and I’m playing. I can play a little bit. That’s about it. But I can’t sing a lick. With the keyboards, I do current stuff, stuff that my kids like, so everything from the Commodores to Rihanna. It might take me a while to figure it out, but I’ll figure it out.”

More dad time: “I’m busy, but it’s been good sort of balancing and juggling all the things that I have going on, and I get a lot of joy from following them and supporting them and carpooling and play dates. It’s cool. I’m having a blast.”

Other ideas in post-retirement: “I have a lot of interests, a lot of things that I want to try to accomplish. The key for me is not to try to do it all at once, but I have a real strong appetite for building a number of business things. They’re going on right now. I do have an appreciation for the humanities, art, theater—things of that nature. I’m not sure I necessarily want to try to monetize things in that regard. I love politics as well. I grew up in Washington, D.C., and that was something that was always a topic of conversation as a kid and through my adolescence.

“The great thing now is I have time to pursue those and to jump right in, so I’m excited about it. I refuse to believe that the best is behind; I believe the best is in front.”

After Long Careers, Hill and Kidd Are on Different Paths This Season

November 4th, 2013

By ANDREW KEH

NY TIMES

Grant Hill celebrated his 41st birthday last month, and on that day he was on the Duke campus, appearing at an event to mark the 50th anniversary of black students attending the university.

As it turned out, the Nets were holding training camp on campus that week, so Hill stopped by practice with plans to tape a segment for his new gig. Hill has begun work this fall as an analyst for Turner Sports and NBA TV.

“Honestly, I had not missed playing,” said Hill, who retired this year after an 18-year playing career. “I had not even thought about it.”

But he stood inside the gym and saw Jason Kidd, with whom he shared the 1995 rookie of the year award, coaching from the sideline. He watched Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett, with whom he battled so many years as a player, run the floor. The old feelings came back.

“It was the first time I was like, ‘Man, I miss this,’ ” he said, laughing. “I wanted to be out there with them.”

Besides the occasional nostalgia, Hill has embraced his new role. He joked that he “prolonged his adolescence a little too long” while playing as many seasons as he did. As a broadcaster, he said he was enjoying learning a new craft and adopting a new routine. He kidded that his new co-workers, like Steve Smith and Chris Webber, were hazing him, making him buy coffee and doughnuts and carry a pink backpack.

“I’m a rookie again,” he said.

As he moved toward retirement, Hill heard from a few teams about possible assistant coaching positions. Front-office jobs were discussed, too. But he felt that he needed to step away from the game, to let his mind and body decompress, so he never considered those routes.

This summer, then, represented the moment that he and Kidd diverged on their parallel professional paths. Almost two decades after sharing the rookie award, the two announced their separate retirements within days of each other. “We were forever joined at the hip,” Hill said.

While Hill could not imagine coaching so quickly after retiring, he said he thought Kidd would thrive.

“I was a little shocked it happened so fast, but I think he’s ready,” he said about Kidd. “He brings credibility. He’s not far removed from the game. To be able to connect, to motivate, to inspire today’s modern athlete, he knows what it takes.”

Kidd does not represent Hill’s only link to the Nets. Hill and Billy King, the Nets’ general manager, grew up in neighboring towns in Virginia. King, now 47, played at Park View High School in Sterling, Va. Hill starred at nearby South Lakes High School.

“I was like 10 years old, and Billy was the man in town,” Hill said, laughing. Hill made his first official visit to Duke when he was a high school junior, and King and Tommy Amaker, who now coaches Harvard, showed him around the campus.

Discussing the trade King orchestrated to bring Pierce and Garnett to the Nets, Hill said: “He pulled this rabbit out of his hat. He’s been creative. He’s made bold moves. And I think he’s assembled an amazing team. It’ll be fun to watch.”

Hill said he believed the Nets and the Indiana Pacers were the two teams from the Eastern Conference best equipped to dethrone the Miami Heat. Traits like physicality, size and length, he said, could trouble the Heat, whose interior game could be a weakness. But, Hill added, “it seems like, as the wind blows, my predictions change.”

Hill’s first major assignment will be hosting “NBA Inside Stuff,” which has been off the air since 2005 after a 15-year run. The show returns Saturday on NBA TV, and Hill’s first interview subject will be Garnett, a player he never knew well during his playing career but respected from afar.

“We’ve had some battles,” Hill said about Garnett. “We’ve had exchanges that probably can’t be repeated.”

Hill said that Garnett would be better this year than last — the Nets’ depth should allow him to rest when necessary — and that his intensity and team-first stance could put the Nets over the top.

“He plays every moment like it’s all or nothing,” Hill said. “Every guy who’s played with him thinks the world of him.”

NBA TV is Bringing Back NBA Inside Stuff with Fresh New Look Including Co-Hosts Grant Hill and Kristen Ledlow

September 24th, 2013

All-New Original Episodes to Premiere Saturday, Nov. 2, at Noon ET

NBA Inside Stuff, the ground-breaking sports and entertainment all-access show, is coming to NBA TV with brand-new episodes featuring co-hosts Grant Hill and Kristen Ledlow set to debut Saturday, Nov. 2, at Noon ET. The series, which last aired in 2005, will combine some of the franchise’s most celebrated segments – redefined versions of “Jam Session” and “Rewind” – with in-depth interviews highlighting some of the NBA’s biggest stars and more, all packaged with a fresh new look.

The 30-minute show will be televised weekly throughout the NBA season (26 episodes), along with several special editions airing at select times during the year. The return of NBA Inside Stuff will also include brand extensions across the entire NBA Digital portfolio and social media integration across all platforms.

“We look forward to bringing Inside Stuff to the next generation of NBA fans,” said Christina Miller, senior vice president and general manager of NBA Digital. “The series will offer fun, original content for our fans including all access features, must-see highlights and all-new segments which we will present across all screens.”

Hill, who recently retired following an 18-year NBA career, will also be joining Turner Sports as an analyst for NBA TV and TNT. He was a seven-time NBA All-Star, five-time All-NBA selection, three-time winner of the NBA Sportsmanship Award and NBA co-Rookie of the Year in 1995. Hill, the third overall pick in the 1994 NBA Draft, played for the Detroit Pistons, Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns and Los Angeles Clippers during his NBA career. He won two NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Championships at Duke University, where his No. 33 is retired.

Ledlow is co-host of The Morning Drive, a sports radio talk show airing on 92.9FM The Game in Atlanta. She’s previously served as a field reporter for Fox Sports and Scout.com covering SEC and ACC football and basketball. Additionally, Ledlow has anchored ABC 27 News and has been a sideline reporter for 97.9 ESPN Radio in Tallahassee, Fla.

Known for its trademark off-the-court features with NBA players, NBA Inside Stuff originally aired from 1990-2005, providing fans with a unique perspective of the game. The trailblazing weekly magazine show was hosted by Emmy Award winner Ahmad Rashad and included a variety of co-hosts through the years, including Julie Moran, Willow Bay, and Summer Sanders.

Seven-Time NBA All-Star Grant Hill to Retire from NBA

June 3rd, 2013

Washington, D.C., June 1, 2013 - Seven-time NBA All-Star and Olympic gold medalist Grant Hill has announced his retirement from professional basketball after 19 seasons in the NBA. At 40
years of age, Hill has amassed over 17,000 points, 6,000 rebounds, 4,000 assists and ends his career as the oldest active player in the league.

Though Hill played his final season with the Los Angeles Clippers, his meteoric rise began his rookie season in 1994 as a member of the Detroit Pistons. Selected with the team’s third overall pick in the 1994 Draft, Hill made NBA history as the first rookie to top the league in fan voting for the All-Star Game, and was co-Rookie of the Year. He would be selected to appear six more times in his seven-year tenure with the team. Hill’s professionalism and class proved indomitable during this period of adversity as he received the first of his league record three NBA Sportsmanship Awards in 2005.

Hill enjoyed a physical renaissance after joining the Phoenix Suns in 2007. For five injury-free seasons, he shined as a key starter and double-digit scorer before his final run with the Clippers in 2012-13. Hill ends his NBA journey after 1,026 regular season games with a career stat line of 16.7 points, 4.1 assists, 6.0 rebounds and one gold medal as a member of the 1996 Olympic team in Atlanta.

“I’m completely at peace with my decision to retire, but it was not arrived at lightly,” said Hill. “After the season, I took time and considered two schools of thought. On one hand, I’m 40 years old and still in great physical condition. My body tells me that I can continue playing. On the other hand, I’m 40 years old and still in great physical condition – a rare parting gift in this sport. I want to enjoy my health, spend quality time with my family and pursue other professional goals. I am blessed to have had the opportunity to spend almost 20 years of my life doing what I truly love, but I believe it is time to move on.”

The son of distinguished business consultant Janet Hill and former All-Pro Dallas Cowboys running back Calvin Hill, Grant chose from an early age to devote his physical and mental gifts to the basketball court. He emerged as a high school phenom in Virginia and was named a McDonald’s All-American before joining the Duke Blue Devils in 1990. Playing under Coach Mike Krzyzewski, Hill played in three Final Fours, winning back-to-back NCAA National Championships in 1991 and 1992 in addition to accumulating such accolades as the NABC Defensive Player of the Year Award (1993), the ACC Player of the Year Award (1994) and recognition as an NCAA First-Team All-American (1994).

In recognition of Hill’s success at every level of competition, he was elected in 2011 to serve on the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame Board of Governors. Though he will not be eligible for induction until 2018, Hill is the first and only active NBA player to hold this position.

Few players in basketball history can rival the scope of Hill’s accomplishments on the court. Fewer still can rival his track record for social responsibility and investment in community. He and wife Tamia, a six-time Grammy nominated recording artist, have impacted countless live through their scholarship programs, contributions to the arts and sciences, and service on boards including the Special Olympics, Make-A-Wish Foundation and the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition.

Hill has previously received the Horizon Award presented by the U.S. Congress, the Community Service Award from Variety Children’s Charity and the Rich and Helen DeVos Community Enrichment Award for his dedicated efforts to varied social causes.

The Hills find a way to make it work

February 6th, 2013

by Michael Martinez

Grant Hill knows exactly where he’ll be Sunday night when the Clippers touch down in Philadelphia for the last stop of their annual Grammy trip – in front of a TV in his hotel room.

His wife, Tamia Hill, is nominated for two Grammys in R&B, and although Grant would love to be sitting next to her when her categories are announced, he knows that duty calls.

The Clippers and Lakers surrender their tenancy at Staples Center every year for the Grammy Awards, which means two weeks on the road for each team. It also means that Hill, who is playing his 17th NBA season and his first with the Clippers, will be 2,700 miles away preparing for Monday night’s against the Philadelphia 76ers.

“It always seems to conflict with the season,” Hill said. “Hopefully she’ll make another album when I retire, and hopefully it’ll get nominated so I’ll get a chance to go.”

Scheduling conflicts are familiar ground for the Hills, whose chosen careers involve considerable travel and time away from home. Not surprisingly, they have three home bases: Orlando, where Hill spent six seasons playing for the Magic and where the family set down roots; Phoenix, where they lived for five years and where their two daughters attend school; and LA, where Grant may end his career playing for the Clippers.

Life, as they both know, is sometimes spent comparing datebooks. But family comes first.

“It’s like a juggling act,” Tamia said. “Sometimes you drop the ball, and you pick it up and start where you left off. As the children get older, it becomes more difficult because now they have a schedule and things they’re doing as well. But at the end of the day, if it isn’t good for me and my family, it isn’t good for me.”

Tamia isn’t just another basketball wife. She’s an accomplished recording artist with her own independent record label, Plus One Music Group, and five albums to her credit. Her current album “Beautiful Surprise” and title song earned her nominations for best R&B album and song.

“That’s the epitome of accomplishment if you’re a recording artist,” Hill said. “It’s similar to winning a championship.”

Hill, 40, won a pair of NCAA titles at Duke, but he’s still without an NBA crown. His pro career has been riddled with injuries that have cost him all or parts of several seasons, including an ankle injury that has required several operations. A bone bruise in his right knee forced him to miss the first 10 weeks of this season.

Tamia understands her husband’s pain; together, they’ve shared their respective medical issues and grown from them. In 2003, at age 28, she learned she had multiple sclerosis.

That’s not the kind of news a person absorbs easily. But earlier that year, Hill had undergone a major surgical procedure on his left ankle. If anyone understood her pain and confusion, he did.

They went to Duke University to consult specialists. While Tamia wondered what was happening to her, Hill looked for answers.

“Grant’s a fighter,” Tamia said. “First thing he said was, ‘Explain this to us. What do we need to do?’ While my head is still spinning, I know I have someone in my corner that’s listening, taking notes and figuring out what we’re going to do to get past it.”

They relied on each other’s strength to get past their difficulties. Whatever crises they face, they know they have someone to help them through.

If anything, Hill said, it has solidified their marriage.

“When you go through tough times and you share it with someone you care for and love, it just brings you closer,” he said. “You see each other at your weakest, at your most vulnerable, and that can either tear you apart or make you stronger. We’ve certainly been through sickness and through health. We take those parts of our vows seriously.

“We grow strength from being there and seeing how each other responds to whatever adversity we’ve gone through. My injuries, my setbacks, my ordeal, I feel watching her strength and continuing with her career and being a mom and wife and friend, and not complaining, that puts things in perspective for me.”

Tamia compares her MS to the volume on a radio dial. Right now, she’s at a one. She admits to feeling fatigue every now and them, but her symptoms are generally under control.

She hasn’t slowed her pace. She completed a 30-city, 2½-month “Single Ladies” tour with R. Kelly in December, and after the Grammys, she’ll begin prepping for several shows overseas.

Last November, after a tour performance, Tamia was able to walk from the Nokia Theatre at LA Live to Staples Center to watch a Clippers game. It was the first time she had been able to sing, then watch her husband, although Hill was still sidelined by his injury.

Although Hill won’t get an opportunity to accompany his wife to the Grammys, both of them hope it will be a big night for her and a big season for the Clippers.

“Hopefully,” she said, “I can get a Grammy and he can get a ring.”

1,000 Reasons for Grant Hill to Smile

January 21st, 2013

by Flan Blinebury

HOUSTON – One thousand games.

There was a time when it seemed more likely he might undergo 1,000 surgeries.

“I’m still here,” said Grant Hill, his feet soaking in a tub of ice that seemed to be melting from the smile on his face.

The fact that he’s still anywhere near an NBA court, let alone running up and down one, is an act of love and stubbornness.

Players like Kevin Garnett and Kobe Bryant have been fortunate to be free of major injuries and blew through their first 1,000 games like they were in the EZ-Pass lane on a highway.

For Hill, it’s been the long, bumpy road that could have made him want to pull over and get off so many times.

“Not when you can do this,” Hill said on Monday night after a 117-109 win over the Rockets gave his Clippers their 30th win of the season and kept them just behind the Thunder for the best record in the league.

This was just one layup early in the second quarter. This was just 16 minutes off the bench. This was just his third game of the season after a bruised bone in his right knee forced him out for the first three months of the schedule.

But this was also chasing that passion that’s driven Hill for as long as he can remember.

Fact is, he probably wouldn’t still have been sitting there in the visitors’ locker room inside the Toyota Center three months past his 40th birthday if everything had gone according to plan as the Duke All-American, the 1995 co-Rookie of the Year, the seven-time NBA All-Star.

Here he is trying to work himself back into game shape for an 18th season because he had so many of them (in what should have been the prime of his career) taken away by ankle and knee surgeries, by a staph infection that could have taken away his life.

“At a time like this, on a night like this, I think about the relationships, the lessons learned,” Hill said. “All the little things become more significant and those are the things I take away.”

The surgeons who kept repairing his body and the trainers and the therapists and the ballboys who did all of the things that let him continue to get back out onto the court time after time. All of the coaches, who gave him space and all of the players who gave him their embrace.

From 2000 through 2006, Hill missed 356 of a possible 492 games. That’s what makes nights like this one still special.

“It goes by so fast,” said veteran teammate Lamar Odom. “One minute you’re coming into the league as a kid ready to take on the world. Then look over there at (Grant) and you can see what it feels like to have this life slipping through your hands. You don’t ever want to let it go. It’s special.”

How fitting then that this might be a very special Clippers team, the kind that could take Hill to the one place he’s never been in the NBA from Detroit to Orlando to Phoenix — reaching out for a real shot at a championship.

“When we lost to the Lakers in the conference finals (2010) and Amar’e (Stoudemire) left, I kinda went, ‘Well, maybe it wasn’t in the cards,’ ” he said. “But Phoenix trying to rebuild might have been the best thing for me personally. I got a chance to come here.

“A lot goes into the winning. There are variables. You need the organization to assemble the talent. You need the coaching. You need the talent to recognize the opportunity that’s there and to give up a little bit of themselves as individuals, and you need lots of things to go right. You’ve got to stay healthy, you know.”

Who knows that better than Hill? He looks at the empty locker stalls a few feet away where 36-year-oldChauncey Billups is still recovering from Achilles’ tendon surgery and tendinitis in his foot, where All-Star and MVP candidate Chris Paul sat out his second straight game with a sore right knee. Hill is the second-oldest player in the league and hasn’t forgotten a year or a month or a day that it took to get here.

“I feel like after all the things that I’ve been through, it’s a reward to be on this team,” he said. “So I’ve been champing at the bit the last three months to get back out there. I’m excited, but also mad at myself for not being where I want to be. I think this team has a chance to be special.”

Grant Hill wiggles his toes in the ice.

One thousand games never felt so good.

Grant Hill Wins 2012 Human Spirit Award

September 13th, 2012

by Eric Patten

Hill joins Chauncey Billups as the second Clippers player in a row to win the Mannie Jackson Basketball Human Spirit Award. Hill was honored during a presentation Sept. 6 as part of the lead up to Saturday’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremonies.

Clippers forward Grant Hill was selected by the Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame as a 2012 recipient of the Mannie Jackson Basketball Human Spirit Award. Hill, University of Connecticut head coach Jim Calhoun, and Founder and Director of the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, Dr. Richard Lapchick, received the award Sept. 6 during the events leading up to Saturday’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremonies.
Hill accepts his award at the Basketball Hall of Fame on September 6, 2012.
Photo: Richard Orr/Basketball Hall of Fame

According to the official Hall of Fame website, the three winners met criteria, including embracing the core values of the game through hard work, dedication, and resilience; striving to continuously improve the community they serve; and making an ongoing commitment to others.

These qualifications extend beyond the sport of basketball as winners also must reflect the values of Harlem Globetrotters chairman Mannie Jackson’s life-long mission to overcome obstacles and challenge the status quo, while also taking responsibility for personal actions and seeking the highest standard of excellence.

“We are proud to honor three of the most deserving selections since the award was established,” Jackson said. “Having known all three personally, I admire their sustained work and contributions to both the game of basketball and their communities.” Hill, 39, was chosen based on his “positive attitude, strong work ethic, and moral code.”

More: Watch Grant Hill’s Speech

He was recently awarded the key to the city in his hometown of Reston, Virginia with proceeds from that reception going to the Medical Care for Children Partnership, which provides medical services for children in need throughout Fairfax County.

In 17 NBA seasons, the Clippers’ forward has received a number of other accolades for his civic involvement. Sporting News named Hill one the “Good Guys in Sports,” he was the 2001 Richard and Helen DeVos Community Enrichment Award winner, and with his wife, Tamia, they have led multiple foundations, including the Tamia & Grant Hill Foundation.

While a member of the Pistons, Hill appeared on behalf of Foot Locker and Fila, at a Detroit middle school to start a program designed to replace backboards in 250 area schools, and GMC Trucks sponsored his visit to the Michigan Special Olympics women’s basketball team.

“Grant has been a leader on and off the court for a long time in this league,” Clippers head coach Vinny Del Negro said. “I’m happy he was recognized by the Hall of Fame for his contributions to the game. There’s nobody more deserving of an award like this.”

Beginning in 2009, finalists for the Human Spirit Award were grouped into three categories, representing the professional, amateur, and grassroots levels of basketball. Hill is the second consecutive Clippers player selected as the representative from the professional category. Guard Chauncey Billups won the award last season. “[Winning the award] says a lot about the character of Grant and Chauncey and the kind of players and people they are,” Del Negro said. “I talk all the time about doing things the right way, and these guys have done things that way their entire careers.”